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Court Not Goo-Goo over Gaga—the FLSA Monster Revisited
10/03/2013

Earlier this year we reported on a lawsuit against pop diva Lady Gaga by a former personal assistant for unpaid overtime. (See Gaga over the FLSA Monster.) For those of you waiting on the edge of your seat to see how the case turned out, here's an update.

If you're late to the party, here's the back story. Stefani Germanotta (aka “Lady Gaga”) hired Jennifer O’Neil, a friend, as her assistant. O’Neil was told that she would receive $75,000 as an annual salary, but nothing was said about overtime. Things went bad, O’Neil was fired, and she now claims Gaga failed to pay her overtime wages when she was “working and/or on call every hour of every day” while on tour with Gaga.

O’Neil had various responsibilities, such as cleaning Gaga’s hotel room, ensuring Gaga was “hopefully” on time to places, making sure Gaga ate and drank when she needed, and handling Gaga’s extensive luggage—generally twenty bags. According to O’Neil, Gaga would wake her during the night to take out a DVD and replace it with another because Gaga was tired of the movie she was watching.
 
In September, a New York court denied Gaga's motion to dismiss O’Neil’s FLSA claim for unpaid wages for on-call time. The court explained that “on-call time can constitute work and is compensable under the FLSA where the employer restricts an employee’s ability to use the time freely for his or her own benefit.” This includes periods of inactivity that are unpredictable and usually of short duration, as the employee is unable to effectively use that time for his own purpose. The case will now proceed to trial, unless there's a settlement.
 
This case serves as a reminder to employers to freshen up on overtime requirements under the FLSA. Just because an employee is paid a salary doesn’t mean that she is not entitled to overtime pay–she must also perform job duties that fit into one of the recognized overtime exemptions. And if the employee isn’t exempt, you have to pay overtime, regardless of any agreement to the contrary with the employee—even if you are fabulous!
 
Stay tuned to Kansas Employment Law Blog to see how the Gaga saga ends.
 


Editors
Don Berner Image
Don Berner, the Labor Law, OSHA, & Immigration Law Guy
Boyd Byers Image
Boyd Byers, the General Employment Law Guy
Jason Lacey Image
Jason Lacey, the Employee Benefits Guy
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